Guide to planting your Arbor Day Foundation tree seedling

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If you visited our table at the Salem Arts Festival on Saturday, June 8th, 2019 and you were the lucky recipient of a tree seedling, then you’re in the right place.  This post contains important planting and care instructions for your baby Tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera) or Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea).

Shameless plug here for Greenlawn’s Tree Inventory Map but I promise it’s relevant – if you’d like to see what these seedlings have the potential to grow up to be, come by the cemetery to check out mature specimens of Tuliptree and Scarlet Oak.  Use the map to find each tree’s location within the cemetery.

 

Tree Planting & Care Guide

This information pertains to both species of trees given out at the festival.

The seedling you have received came from the Arbor Day Foundation and so their instructions for planting and care are what is recommended and linked to below.  Also, both tree species offered as seedlings are native to Massachusetts and other selected areas of New England and as such should fare well if planted locally.

Comprehensive Tree Planting & Care Guide – this link provides all the information you will need to know in order to plant your seedling and help it to grow strong and tall in the years to come; Arbor Day Foundation also provides video instruction on how to care for your seedling; feel free to click around and learn as there’s a ton of information here that will help you and your tree on your new journey together.

Bare root planting guide – the seedlings you received are what is known as “bare root trees” meaning that instead of being in soil with a root system balled up into a burlap sack or a container, the roots are free and simply dipped into a hydrating gel that keeps the roots moist until planting; the main planting & care guide provides all sorts of information for all three types of prepared seedlings/saplings but this link is specifically for the seedlings you received from us at the Salem Arts Festival.  If you are in need of an easily printable version of the planting guide for bare root trees, Arbor Day Foundation provides a downloadable PDF copy – they link to it at the top of their bare root planting guide page.

 

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Tuliptree leaf in waning autumn colors with a bit of the parent tree’s bark in the right background; photo taken in late October 2013

Tuliptree (Liriodendron tulipifera)

Here’s some more information about Tuliptrees from the Arbor Day Foundation and a few other handy plant databases.

Arbor Day Foundation’s nursery listing for Tuliptree – this link provides some basic information about Tuliptrees.

Go Botany’s listing for Tuliptree – this website is actually a database project headed up by the Native Plant Trust (formerly known as the New England Wildflower Society) with support from the National Science Foundation; Go Botany’s main site is also an excellent resource for information on native and naturalized trees (and other plants) growing within the six New England states (MA, ME, NH, CT, RI, VT); plenty of photos with each species listing to oogle at and use to help identify unknown specimens.

Virginia Tech’s Dendrology Fact Sheet for Tuliptree – this is a direct link to the fact sheet for Tuliptree; the parent site offers a lot of useful information on trees with a fact sheet database for over 450 different tree species as well as a handy tree ID app for Android and iOS.

USDA’s PLANTS Database page on Tuliptree – this is the listing in the national database run by the US Dept. of Agriculture; each species listing page also provides downloadable fact sheets in PDF form for that species, as well as photos, conservation status, maps, and information on how it benefits local wildlife.

 

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The rich autumnal coloring of the aptly named Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea); photo taken in late October 2013

 

Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea)

Here’s some more information about Scarlet Oaks from the Arbor Day Foundation and a few other handy plant databases.  Databases below are the same as ones mentioned above, only this time the links bring you directly to the Scarlet Oak listings (and not the listings for Tuliptrees).

Arbor Day Foundation’s nursery listing for Scarlet Oak – this link provides some basic information about Scarlet Oaks.

Go Botany’s listing for Scarlet Oak – here’s Go Botany’s database listing for Scarlet Oaks

Virginia Tech’s Dendrology Fact Sheet for Scarlet Oak – this is a direct link to VT’s fact sheet for Scarlet Oak.

USDA’s PLANTS Database page on Scarlet Oak – USDA’s database listing for Scarlet Oak.

 

 

 

FOG Event – This Saturday!!

Just a reminder that this Saturday, June 9th, FOG will be hosting it’s spring event.  This event is a tour through Greenlawn Cemetery featuring Artists, Authors, and Poets.  The Dickson Memorial Chapel will be open from 9:30AM-1:00PM for viewing, sales, and donations with the tour itself departing from the chapel at 10:00AM.

Items available for sale at the event can be previewed from our new FOG gear page here.  There will also be some paintings and a print by Debra Freeman Highberger up for silent auction (pictured below).

We hope to see you there!

 

Scenic painting of Greenlawn Cemetery
Painting of a quiet space in Greenlawn

 

Scenic painting of Greenlawn Cemetery
Painting of Sargent Pond

 

Fountain Pond
Print of Painting of Fountain Pond

 

 

 

Birdwatching and Gardening in May

Guided Bird Walk

Despite being situated in the middle of a busy urban area, Greenlawn Cemetery offers a peaceful respite for many species of flora and fauna that one would typically not see this close to downtown.  Some of the more well-known inhabitants are of the feathered sort – the birds who make Greenlawn their home or their layover on a long flight home.  To date, Greenlawn’s most dedicated birdwatchers have seen over 100 different species within the cemetery.

Bright and early on May 13, 2018, Charlie Lipson led a group of folks through Greenlawn on a guided bird walk.  The skies were overcast but that did not deter the group from being able to catch over 25 different species of birds up and at ’em that morning.  The usual visitors were present – a Black-Crowned Night Heron (our mascot), a Double-crested Cormorant, a few Mallards, and some Red-Winged Blackbirds to name a few.  The group was also graced with a Ruby-Throated Hummingbird flyby!

 

FOG Guided Birdwalk - May 13, 2018
Early risers enjoying those on flight

 

FOG Guided Birdwalk - May 13, 2018
Dedicated watchers with their binoculars

 

Thanks to all who came out for the guided bird walk!  It was a successful event and folks got to learn a lot about birds, trees, and shrubs.

 

Conservatory Garden Clean-up

About a week later on May 19, 2018, a group of folks took to sprucing up the Conservatory Garden next to the Dickson Memorial Chapel.  Flowers were planted, mulch was laid, and weeds were pulled as volunteers helped to clean up the garden that lies where the old conservatory used to be.  Mr. Dickson would be proud of the work these folks pulled off!

 

Conservatory Garden Clean-up - May 19, 2018
Polly, Denise, Michelle, Denise, and Richard (not pictured) did a great job!

 

Conservatory Garden Clean-up - May 19, 2018
Mulch, mulch, and more mulch!

 

Conservatory Garden Clean-up - May 19, 2018
A view of the finished product

 

Conservatory Garden Clean-up - May 19, 2018
Another angle on work well done!

 

Thanks again to Polly, Denise, Michelle, Denise, and Richard for all their hard work cleaning up the garden!  Thanks also to the Sean and his Greenlawn Cemetery crew who keep the grounds looking good.  Oh – and thanks to those who worked hard last year planting bulbs so that we could enjoy their colorful blooms this year!

Notables Buried at Greenlawn: John Phillip Rilley

“Extraordinary bravery and coolness”.      Image

 

Landsman John Phillip Rilley (or Riley) was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Spanish-American War when he was just 21 years old. His citation notes: “On board the U.S.S. Nashville during the operation of cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Rilley displayed extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action”

 

From www.homeofheroes.com: “The mission was a daring operation to cut undersea cables linking the Spanish fortifications at Cienfuegos with the rest of the world. Destruction of the cables was ordered to disrupt communications. In two boats, sailors from the USS Nashville and the USS Marblehead were joined by a Marine guard as they moved within 15 feet of the enemy shore, under fire from the hidden enemy, to dredge up and cut two such cables. During the 80 minute operation, the cable cutting party was under constant enemy fire from a short range, while they coolly dredged the cables across the bow of their boats, then cut through them with hacksaws.”

 

Mr. Rilley was born in 1877 in AllentownPA, and died in Salem November 16, 1950.

 

Hooded Mergansers and Buffleheads at Sargent Pond

Three pairs of Hooded Mergansers at Sargent Pond on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012. This is a frame capture from video. One of the males had just put his “hood” up…..

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Here’s a still shot of the group, showing off some of the females….

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Here are some still shots of male Buffleheads…..

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…and a couple of frame captures of Bufflehead pairs….

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Road Trip to Mount Auburn Cemetery, Part 1

Lisa, Pat, and Leslie visited Mount Auburn Cemetery on Friday, July 27.

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We saw gorgeous landscaping…

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(Yes, that’s Pat taking a photo.)

Tagged trees…

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…and shrubs…

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Creative ground cover of all types — here’s one example (this is actually tall grass, photographed from a height):

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Here it is “in context,” looking straight down from the top of Washington Tower (95 steps to reach the top):

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(Yes, that’s Pat sitting on the bench below.)

We found Salem’s own Nathaniel Bowditch…

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…and another native son of Salem, Samuel Putnam…

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…sharing his wife’s family plot with James Russell Lowell:

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Nearby we found (after much searching) Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s resting place.

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We also came across that of George Angell (of Angell Memorial Hospital fame):

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Other noteworthy sights:

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(Especially handy for visitors who come when the Information Center is closed. Holds racks with maps and informational literature. Some is free; some are 50c or $1, paid on the honor system.)

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(One of several donation boxes.)

Signage is dignified and clear. Supplementing signs like these are information handouts and posters reminding people to treat the site with respect.

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More sights:

Paupers’ burial ground. This is one of just 60 cast-iron fences enclosing plots in the cemetery, down from about 1,700 in the 1850s. Maintenance issues and aesthetics led to the removal of most of these enclosures. The ones that remain are given special attention and protective treatment.

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This stunning tree has us stumped — anyone know what it is?

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And what about this bird, that we saw in Halcyon Pond? Possibly a juvenile cormorant?

Charlie or Cody, what do you think?

 

Finally, a view in Consecration Dell (site of the cemetery’s consecration in 1831).

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